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Print Vogue

Print Vogue is a high-end print shop catering to artists looking for alternative materials to work with. We have a large selection of the best giclée and c-type papers around, and have also developed systems for printing on more unusual materials including metal, wood, bamboo, glass, mirror and canvas. My husband and I founded Print Vogue in 2012, expanding and rebranding in 2013 with the successful funding of our Kickstarter project, allowing us to bring to market our  Neo-Ambros and Neo-Daguerros — two products you won’t find anywhere else.

Print Vogue uses C-Type, Giclée, Dye-Sublimation and UV printing technologies to offer the widest range of alternative materials you’ll find in one place. And takes advantage our our fine art and film backgrounds to help our clients create the most unique presentations possible. If you are interested in producing beautiful art for a gallery, museum, film set or home, feel free to take a look at PrintVogue.com for more information.

 

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image process [#1] orphan

The main on end sequence for the movie Orphan, which I created with designer/director Simon Clowes at Prologue films, was my first experience with shooting stop-motion. For the project, we were lucky enough to have Jamie Calliri come down to provide software, a rig, and all kinds of adivce. Jamie, an incredibly talented artist and director, is most known for his stop-motion animations for projects such as the Lemony Snicket title sequence. He has also created a high-end stop-motion software program called Dragonframe, which we used for Orphan.

In addition to the software, Jamie set up a motion-control rig which allowed us to program the camera movements and shots from the rig, directly into Dragonframe. The result was, we were able to shoot two identical passes of each shot: one in regular light and one under blacklight. This was key to the central metaphor of the sequence, and the movie, allowing Simon to take the footage after I shot it, and seamlessly cut back and forth between the two identical passes for each shot, revealing the dark undertones that lay just beneath the beautiful surface.

Everything was done in this manner, even the time lapse flowers and falling petals. The only shot not done with the rig was the shot of a burning photo at the end which was done on a Red Camera in high-speed. You can see more about the project, and the software on the Dragonframe website, and a video of the final sequence with additional info is also posted here in my portfolio section.

 

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